Mozilla Firefox getting native support for H.264/AAC/MP3 on Windows 7 and later

Mozilla Firefox getting native support for H.264/AAC/MP3 on Windows 7 and later

Mozilla developers have announced that they have enabled native support for H.264/AAC/MP3 file formats on latest nightlies of Firefox for Windows 7 and later.

This option is now enabled by default and would be used by HTML5 video and audio elements.

This feature is expected to become part of the stable build of Firefox 22 which is currently scheduled to ship on June 25.

YouTube is now converting all uploaded videos to WebM format

YouTube is now converting all uploaded videos to WebM format

Google has taken another step to ensure that WebM becomes a popular format on their YouTube platform.

All new videos being uploaded to YouTube would get a WebM version. This is in addition to the other formats it already supports (h.264).

This is a good development as it would negate the need to have any plugin on browsers like Mozilla Firefox, Opera Browser and Google Chrome (which would soon support for h.264 format videos). All these browsers come loaded with internal support for WebM video format.

Google said that they are not discarding H.264 as it continues to remain the most popular and supported video format on the web. But they continue to expand support for WebM which is expected to become their core focus in the years to come.

YouTube added that they are also in the process of converting all existing video files hosted with them in WebM format. They make sure that all popular content is available in all the supported video formats already.

Microsoft makes available Windows Media Player HTML5 Extension for Chrome

Microsoft makes available Windows Media Player HTML5 Extension for Chrome

Google recently announced that they are going to drop support for H.264 videos in Chrome. The company has supported this video format since the first version of their web browser.

Google is putting its weight behind WebM video format which they have released in open source.

Microsoft has now released a plugin for Chrome that works on the Windows operating system. This plugin would fill in the void by allowing Chrome users to access H.264 videos even after Google removes the internal support.

The company already provides a similar plugin for Mozilla Firefox browser. Internet Explorer comes with support for H.264.

Microsoft said: “Today, as part of the interoperability bridges work we do on this team, we are making available the Windows Media Player HTML5 Extension for Chrome, which is an extension for Google Chrome to enable Windows 7 customers who use Chrome to continue to play H.264 video.”

The company further said that Internet Explorer 9 would support WebM videos as long as a codec supporting it is installed on the machine.

Relevant Tweet:

Google talks about WebM. Plugins coming for Internet Explorer and Apple Safari!

Google talks about WebM. Plugins coming for Internet Explorer and Apple Safari!

Google has posted a detailed report on why they are dropping H.264 support from Chrome. And why they are going to focus on WebM when it comes to web video.

The company highlighted the part that both Microsoft and Apple are supporting H.264 while Mozilla and Opera are sticking with open source alternatives like WebM.

Google has supported both till now but would soon remove H.264 from their Chrome browser.

To enable support for WebM in IE and Safari, they would release plugins for them. The plugins would be designed to be used with the HTML5 Video Tag.

Microsoft developers have already criticized Google for supporting a less popular format over a much popular one. WebM is relatively a very new product in this segment of the market and is not supported widely. But Google is looking towards the future and they are betting on WebM.

Google to remove support for H.264 in future versions of Chrome!

Google to remove support for H.264 in future versions of Chrome!

Google has made a significant statement on the Chromium blog. The company has said that they are committed to open source standards and this means that they are going to remove native support for H.264 in future versions of Chrome.

The company would continue to support open source technologies like WebM (VP8) and Theora. And new codec support would be added based on popularity and demand.

Google said:

We expect even more rapid innovation in the web media platform in the coming year and are focusing our investments in those technologies that are developed and licensed based on open web principles. To that end, we are changing Chrome’s HTML5

In other words, the company wants the web video to migrate to HTML5 powered by open source technologies. It is not clear why they are still bundling Adobe Flash Player with Chrome!

Microsoft adds support for HTML5 playback using Windows Media Player in Mozilla Firefox!

Microsoft adds support for HTML5 playback using Windows Media Player in Mozilla Firefox!

Microsoft might be working extremely hard on Internet Explorer 9 to make it your favorite web browser. But they know that they have to support the users of alternative browsers as well. At least on their own operating system platforms.

The company has now launched an extension for Mozilla Firefox that enables the users of Windows 7 to get support for playing H.264-encoded videos on HTML5 pages in Firefox using the technologies already present on the operating system.

Microsoft spoke about this feature:

The Extension is based on a Firefox Add-on that parses HTML5 pages and replaces Video tags with a call to the Windows Media Player plug-in so that the content can be played in the browser. The Add-on replaces video tags only if the video formats specified in the tag are among those supported by Windows Media Player. Tags that contain other video formats are not touched.

Mozilla Firefox does not support native playback of H.264-encoded videos because of licensing issues.

YouTube: Not ready to replace Adobe Flash with HTML5 for video delivery

YouTube: Not ready to replace Adobe Flash with HTML5 for video delivery

Google owned video sharing service YouTube remains the most popular destination on the web for watching user created videos in addition to original stuff from media companies around the world.

So, they have a huge responsibility when it comes to setting the unofficial standards for video delivery on the web.

YouTube has been largely powered by Adobe Flash technology for their video delivery mechanism.

However, they have been supporting HTML5 based video delivery for a while now.

The company has now stated why they (and the web generally) is not prepared to replace Adobe Flash with HTML5 when it comes to delivery of videos on the web.

Here are some of the reasons they talk about…

It is largely complicated for them to offer each of the videos through multiple video formats. They officially support H.264 codec which is supported by Adobe Flash Player. But it is not supported by Mozilla Firefox if delivered through HTML5. They are of course offering some videos through WebM which is an open source technology offered by Google.

HTML5 is in early stages now and it does not provide all the features that Adobe Flash provides when it comes to video delivery. One good example is making it easy for the user to get to the part of the video they want when they launch the video.

HTML5 does not offer robust content protection when it comes to delivery of web based videos.

Embedding is another problem. Adobe Flash makes it easy for them to offer embedding solutions.

Camera and Microphone support… YouTube allows you to record videos right within the web browser using Adobe Flash technology. HTML5 cannot do it yet.

Fullscreen video support. Some browsers have added support for it. Others have not.

Mozilla Firefox and Opera to support Google WebM project

Mozilla Firefox and Opera to support Google WebM project

Google has announced that Mozilla and Opera have given their support for their just launched WebM project.

Google WebM project is designed to provide an open source video format that can be used for video delivery over the web.

H.264 is currently the most popular format. It is free for now but could become a paid offering in the future. It is also not open source.

H.264 is supported by Apple Safari, Internet Explorer and Google Chrome. Mozilla and Opera does not support it because of licensing reasons.

Google WebM comes loaded with VP8 video codec and Vorbis audio codec. The entire framework is open source and hence free.

It remains to be seen if Microsoft and Apple would support in in the future. There is few reasons not to considering it is free and open source. It can be supported along with other technologies like H.264.

Google is also working on delivering YouTube videos through this new video standard.

Internet Explorer Team: HTML5 is the future of the web!

Internet Explorer Team: HTML5 is the future of the web!

Internet Explorer remains the most popular web browser on the web. And it remains the most criticized web browser on the web as well.

Internet Explorer is heavily criticized for not supporting the latest web technologies. But things are changing.

Microsoft is betting big on HTML5 with Internet Explorer 9 which could arrive later this year.

Microsoft Internet Explorer team has officially stated on their blog that they believe HTML5 is the future of the web.

They are going to support HTML5 Video element with H.264.

This particular statement from the company is a major disappointment for the web users who are very much concerned about the proprietary nature of the H.264 standard. There are alternative video technologies that have been adopted by Opera and Mozilla. Microsoft has technically picked up a closed standard to support when it comes to running video content through HTML5 Video element.

Apple Safari is also taking the same path. Google Chrome for now support multiple formats. (Checkout the comments on the link below to see all the hatred from people who want more from Microsoft).

Dean Hachamovitch, General Manager, Internet Explorer spoke about the future of video on the web:

Today, video on the web is predominantly Flash-based. While video may be available in other formats, the ease of accessing video using just a browser on a particular website without using Flash is a challenge for typical consumers. Flash does have some issues, particularly around reliability, security, and performance. We work closely with engineers at Adobe, sharing information about the issues we know of in ongoing technical discussions. Despite these issues, Flash remains an important part of delivering a good consumer experience on today’s web.